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SanFranciscoBay_Adapt2SeaLevelRise_CostData

Citation

Hirschfeld, Daniella; Hill, Kristina; Plane, Ellen (2017), SanFranciscoBay_Adapt2SeaLevelRise_CostData, Other, https://doi.org/10.6078/D1KK59

Abstract

As awareness of climate change increases government agencies, non profits and community groups are working to develop strategic plans for sea level rise adaptation. To better understand specific choices for sea level rise adaptation we examined potential costs to raise current protective infrastructure to future water levels in the context of sea level rise and storm events.

Methods

Our analysis is based on four primary steps. First we reclassified the shoreline infrastructure data from San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI). We used the following dictionary to reclassify the data in terms of the Landform / Wall value: {'Berm': 'Landform', 'Channel or Opening': 'Landform', 'Shoreline Protection Structure': 'Landform','Embankment': 'Landform', 'Engineered Levee': 'Landform', 'Floodwall': 'Wall', 'Natural Shoreline': 'Landform','Transportation Structure': 'Wall', 'Water Control Structure': 'Wall', 'Wetland': 'Landform'}. We used the following dictionary to reclassify the data in terms of the Dynaic / Static value {'Berm': 'Static', 'Channel or Opening': 'Static', 'Shoreline Protection Structure': 'Static','Embankment': 'Static', 'Engineered Levee': 'Static', 'Floodwall': 'Static', 'Natural Shoreline': 'Dynamic','Transportation Structure': 'Static', 'Water Control Structure': 'Dynamic', 'Wetland': 'Dynamic'}. Additionally, for some of the shoreline protection structure sites we used google earth and site visits to shift their categorization from landform to wall. Second we conducted a rapid assessment of overtopping by subtracting the current shoreline heights from USGS’s projected future water levels. The third step was to calculate potential costs, which we based on estimates for Bay Area projects. For walls our estimates were based on a study done for the Port of San Francisco focused on the Embarcadero. From this we got a low of $25,000 per linear meter per meter of elevation, a middle value of $230,000 and a high of $496,000. For landforms we used a mix of data for horizontal levees and the South Bay Shoreline Study. From this we got a low of $2,700 per linear meter per meter of elevation, a middle value of $5,000 and a high of $13,200. Finally we generated three potential shorelines. The most bayward is called “Adaptation_Regional_Edge_Current_Cost” is based on SFEI’s Bayshore_Defense category with the values “First line of shoreline defense” or “Wetland on Bay shore.” The other two are based on SFEI’s Bay Area Aquatic Resources Inventory and capture the saltwater and freshwater habitat zones. The one called “Adaptation_Regional_Edge_Salt_Cost” is in the middle and is based on the saltwater habitat. The one called “Adaptation_Regional_Edge_Fresh_Cost” is the most landward and is based on the freshwater habitat.

Funding

McQuown Fellowship,

References